aaamaaa:

Some people have shit taste in anime but so do I! Nobody wins were all nerds who like animated characters


textpostsandcats:

being a pizza delivery driver is great because literally no one is disappointed to see you


ignite-mylove-ignite:

ligerscout:

ligerscout:

Ready for April fools day
Gonna take it to school and eat it

I ate 3/4 of the jar and I made 3 teachers gag and one friend get angry at me.

fuck bro, I thought you were gunna fill all those cups with mayonnaise and hand them out at school and some serious shit was gunna go down


goto-blog:

#Programming in movies vs. programming in real life


queenhyrule:

it’s both strange and amazing to see how a fictional character (or more) can help you and be your support through a bunch of bullshit in life.

sure they’re just fictional people, but that attachment you have sure isn’t. even if it’s just a teeny little pick-me-up to make you smile or laugh, it’s worth remembering that they left that impact on you.


alainakate:

Shounen Hollywood is easily the most underrated anime of the season.
It seems like literally no one is watching this show. To be fair, I put off watching it until episode 7. I went in not really knowing what to expect, and what I came out of was a show that is not about boys becoming idols, but about the aspiring idols who don’t really make it. Granted, I don’t know how it’s going to end, but it has been heavily implied throughout the entire show that they are probably not going to be successful idols. It’s a slice-of-life, coming of age story, but underneath that, a subtle and pessimistic look at how the idol industry exploits teens to become idols and to want to become idols with promises of fame and fun, if only to become a flavor-of-the week and fade into obscurity.
The story centers around an idol revival group called Shounen Hollywood, with the original achieving popularity 15 years prior to the story. The main character, Kakeru (the one with the red background), is scouted into the group at his part time job at a juice bar. He’s a prettyboy type, to whom everything seems to come easily, but who has absolutely no direction. He has no idea what he wants to do, he can’t sing, and he is the first to realize and acknowledge that he is part of a group of teenage boys put together for a revival that no one really wanted. With that in mind, his monologues and experiences set the tone of the show.
The group works in a theatre called Hollywood Tokyo. Makki (green), is a high school dropout and the leader of the group, despite being the weakest link. He puts the most energy and heart into making the group successful largely because he is desperate for approval, a point illustrated in the way he interacts with the theatre’s pet owl who, being an owl, doesn’t show affection toward him no matter how nice he is to it. The yellow one, Tommy, initially introduced as Mii, is a fanboy who comes from the same group home as one of the original members of the group…also named Tommy. He’s been a fan of Shounen Hollywood since he was a child, and has seemingly molded himself into the original Tommy’s image as a way to escape his pretty bleak reality. Kira (blue) and Shun (pink) have the most talent, but Shun is a narcissist who appears to view the group as a stepping stone to his solo career (but ironically cannot be fucked to put effort into making the group a viable stepping stone), and Kira is an ex-child star with a stage mom who has given him a superiority complex. Their manager, a member of the original Shounen Hollywood, is a forever 17 who called himself “GOD” and is blatantly reviving the group because he is stuck in the past.
They are a clusterfuck. They are doomed from the beginning, and absolutely none of it is acknowledged. And that is what is so wonderful about it.
In one episode, Tommy watches a video made by the original Shounen Hollywood members. They are all going around telling the camera what their dreams are. It is then that Tommy begins to understand what it means to be an idol. “None of their dreams came true,” he says sadly. In a later reimagining of the scene by the new members, he says, “I want to sing and dance with everyone forever.” The viewers, of course, are to understand that it probably isn’t going to happen.
The plot is fairly standard, and the interesting parts are in the ways they communicate with each other, and the ways each boy grows into and out of his role in the idol group, and the nature of the idol industry in general. The final episode is next Saturday. I hope that there is no big resolution to the series. I hope they leave it ambiguous. ☆

alainakate:

Shounen Hollywood is easily the most underrated anime of the season.

It seems like literally no one is watching this show. To be fair, I put off watching it until episode 7. I went in not really knowing what to expect, and what I came out of was a show that is not about boys becoming idols, but about the aspiring idols who don’t really make it. Granted, I don’t know how it’s going to end, but it has been heavily implied throughout the entire show that they are probably not going to be successful idols. It’s a slice-of-life, coming of age story, but underneath that, a subtle and pessimistic look at how the idol industry exploits teens to become idols and to want to become idols with promises of fame and fun, if only to become a flavor-of-the week and fade into obscurity.

The story centers around an idol revival group called Shounen Hollywood, with the original achieving popularity 15 years prior to the story. The main character, Kakeru (the one with the red background), is scouted into the group at his part time job at a juice bar. He’s a prettyboy type, to whom everything seems to come easily, but who has absolutely no direction. He has no idea what he wants to do, he can’t sing, and he is the first to realize and acknowledge that he is part of a group of teenage boys put together for a revival that no one really wanted. With that in mind, his monologues and experiences set the tone of the show.

The group works in a theatre called Hollywood Tokyo. Makki (green), is a high school dropout and the leader of the group, despite being the weakest link. He puts the most energy and heart into making the group successful largely because he is desperate for approval, a point illustrated in the way he interacts with the theatre’s pet owl who, being an owl, doesn’t show affection toward him no matter how nice he is to it. The yellow one, Tommy, initially introduced as Mii, is a fanboy who comes from the same group home as one of the original members of the group…also named Tommy. He’s been a fan of Shounen Hollywood since he was a child, and has seemingly molded himself into the original Tommy’s image as a way to escape his pretty bleak reality. Kira (blue) and Shun (pink) have the most talent, but Shun is a narcissist who appears to view the group as a stepping stone to his solo career (but ironically cannot be fucked to put effort into making the group a viable stepping stone), and Kira is an ex-child star with a stage mom who has given him a superiority complex. Their manager, a member of the original Shounen Hollywood, is a forever 17 who called himself “GOD” and is blatantly reviving the group because he is stuck in the past.

They are a clusterfuck. They are doomed from the beginning, and absolutely none of it is acknowledged. And that is what is so wonderful about it.

In one episode, Tommy watches a video made by the original Shounen Hollywood members. They are all going around telling the camera what their dreams are. It is then that Tommy begins to understand what it means to be an idol. “None of their dreams came true,” he says sadly. In a later reimagining of the scene by the new members, he says, “I want to sing and dance with everyone forever.” The viewers, of course, are to understand that it probably isn’t going to happen.

The plot is fairly standard, and the interesting parts are in the ways they communicate with each other, and the ways each boy grows into and out of his role in the idol group, and the nature of the idol industry in general. The final episode is next Saturday. I hope that there is no big resolution to the series. I hope they leave it ambiguous. ☆


cyanblur:

i remember one time the simpsons made a joke about fox news and they got so insulted they tried to sue them but the court was like “this aired on ur network u can’t sue urself”


unsuccessfulmetalbenders:

if u think that there has ever been a greater scene on television think again


reo-swagwagon:

strategiczergface:

shit

Anime is finally real thank you Ron Paul

reo-swagwagon:

strategiczergface:

shit

Anime is finally real thank you Ron Paul


oxbowb:

ive been fucked over by this and i was basically forcefully outed to my family because they kept staring at my screen and because i want yall safe and i dont want any of you to experience this consider these two easy safety measures if you have family/friends nearby with the…